How does the Dangerous Dogs Act affect you and your dog?

If you are unsure, come and talk to our team at Warrens



Whether you own a large breed or a tiny one, the Dangerous Dogs Act applies to you and your dog. It is against the law to let your dog be dangerously out of control in:

  • A public place
  • In a private place (this can include a neighbour’s house or garden)
  • In the owner’s home

This law applies to all dogs.

If your dog injures someone, or makes them worry that it might injure them, then it is dangerously out of control.

The consequences can be devastating. You could be fined or sent to prison and your dog could be destroyed.

The team here at Warrens specialise in dealing with dangerous dog cases. We work, together with our experts, to achieve the best outcome possible for you and your dog.

Jo-Rosie Haffenden is our resident expert witness. Jo is an expert in canine behaviour, running her own school for dogs (School4dogs). She is accredited by the Institute of Modern Dog Trainers (IMDT). She worked for a national animal charity, contributing to the Dangerous Dogs Act Study Group and spearheading the educational programme RespectABull. Jo has helped to bring many cases to a happy conclusion for both owner and dog.

Jo will see and assess your dog, either in its home environment or at kennels if your dog has been seized. She will then prepare a report for the Court, giving evidence if necessary. Jo has personally been through the Dangerous Dogs Act legal process with her own registered pit bull terrier, Archie.

Article from Your Pet, Issue 1, 2016

by Paula Bristow
YourPetCover

Even the most docile, well-mannered dog could fall foul of the Dangerous Dogs Act if put in the wrong situation. If you need advice or assistance, Call Paula Bristow at Warrens.

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